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You’re All Alone

First published in 1972 by Ace as a Paperback

Leiber began writing this, (what would have been his his third) novel in January 1943. He expected that it would be about 40,000 word long and that it would be sold for publication in “Unknown”. However, “Unknown” was to be discontinued shortly. With no other outlets, Leiber stopped working on the novel.

After the second World War, Leiber resumed work on the novel, hoping to sell it to William Sloan Associates. Frits expanded it to 75,000 words but William Sloan Associates had discontinued publishing fantasy due to poor sales. Leiber sent the (longer) novel to the editors of “Fantastic Adventures”, who agreed to buy it only if Leiber could cut it to 40,000 words. Leiber set the 75,000 word manuscript aside, went back to his original 1943 versionfor a 40,000 word short novel and recreated it as a parallel text. It was published by “Fantastic Adventures” in July 1950 as “You’re All Alone”.

The 75,000 word version was eventually published by Universal Publishers and Distributors in 1953 for publication as one half of a paperback double (with Bulls, Blood and Passion). Due to the contract, the publisher could make any changes it wanted. The result was the “The Sinful Ones”. In addition, the publisher added “sexed up” chapter titles like “The Strip Tease” and “Bleached Prostitute” and “sexed up” a few love scenes in the book.

In 1972, Ace reprinted the 40,000 word (Fantastic) version slong with other stories (Four Ghosts in Hamlet and The Creature from Cleveland Depths) in a collection also titled “You’re All Alone”. In the late 1970s, Leiber repurchased the rights to the his longer version and it was reprinted by Pocket in October 1980. Fritz left in the 1953 titles, but restored the mangled text from memory since the original manuscript had been lost. He also rewrote the sex scenes to bring the language up to date.

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The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction

Running from 1949 to the present day, this magazine was where many of Fritz’s more abstract stories were first published, as well as several Lankhmar tales.



Covers are only shown where they are for one of Fritz’s stories.

table.sortable img{ width:100%; max-width:80px; }
CoverStoryIssue
When The Last Gods Die1951 / 12
The Big Holiday1953 / 01
The Silence Game1954 / 04
Last1957 / 03
http://www.lankhmar.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/FSF_0077.jpgThe Big Trek1957 / 10
A Deskful of Girls (kelley Freas cover)1958 / 04
Little Old Miss Macbeth1958 / 10
http://www.lankhmar.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/FSF_0092.jpgThe Silver Eggheads1959 / 01
The Oldest Soldier1960 / 05
The Man Who made Friends with Electricity1962 / 03
http://www.lankhmar.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/FSF_0135.jpgThe Secret Songs1962 / 08
Myths My Great-Granddaughter Taught Me1963 / 01
Game for Motel Room1963 / 03
Kindergarden1963 / 04
Success1963 / 07
237 Talking Statues Etc.1963 / 09
When the Change-Winds Blow 1964 / 08
Four Ghosts in Hamlet1965 / 01
The Winter Flies1967 / 10
The Turned-off Heads1968 / 01
http://www.lankhmar.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/FSFJUL69.jpgShip of Shadows1969 / 07
Ill Met in Lankhmar1970 / 04
The Price of Pain-Ease1971 / 11
The Lotus Eaters1972 / 02
Cats Three1973 / 10
Catch That Zeppelin!1975 / 03
The Cat Hotel1983 / 10

Selected Stories

A very good compilation from 2010, containing a fair spread of stories.

The Ghost Light

First published in 1984 by Berkeley as a Paperback

Released as a celebration of his work, it is perhaps the most wide ranging of his collections. Fafhrd & the Mouser, cats, chess and sex ,all of Fritz’s preoccupations, are covered. It also contains a fascinating autobiographical essay.

Notable Editions: Berkley HB limited to 750 copies signed by Leiber.

An audiobook is also available from Audible/Amazon.

Contains the following short stories (listed in alphabetical order)

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